Dr. Christine Ngaruiya

Dr. Christine Ngaruiya’s work embodies what it must mean to have a lot of fight, to never run out of fight. Even as most global health practitioners focus on infectious diseases in the developing world, Dr. Ngaruiya is among visionaries leading action against noncommunicable diseases through her work, also teaching and mentoring the next generation of changemakers at Yale and beyond, as well as leading research with her professional peers at WHO, NIH and across health ministries in East African countries.

This level of commitment to a global challenge would overwhelm most people, but Dr. Ngaruiya has also sat on several national and international leadership organizations such as the board of a refugee resettlement agency in New Haven, and written in publications such as the Huffington Post to engage the general public on healthcare issues and more.

We think Christine’s secret might lie in her essential life lesson and in her love for travel — because to possess divine wonder, to live, to travel with grace, gratitude and awareness, is to embrace the world and its people. To embrace the world is to aspire to better parts of it, and to so aspire is to discover purpose.

From Dr. Christine Ngaruiya . . .

To run the world I wear

a dress, high heels, a blazer, and a statement purse — likely with a red lip!

One of the most essential lessons I have learnt is

God first, be gracious to all, say thank you, and never assume (latter from the Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz).

 

I am currently reading

When Breath Becomes Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi (biography of a physician with a terminal illness), and

Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff (on the Trump Whitehouse)

My go-to accessory is

a rose-gold watch with slender metallic strap and large face, by Michael Kors – simple, elegant, unobtrusive and EASY TO READ (ref large face!). I’ve always been keen on wearing a watch, despite all the technological advances with our smart phones and all that do tell the time. Plus when I’m working clinically, having a watch helps in various settings. I love gold, but when I bought this watch, also wanted something that could complement a silver jewelry panel (although I’ve been told by my most fashion forward friends that MIXING metallics is the new vogue anyway! I’m learning!), so the rose gold was a perfect fit. When I have my watch on, I feel that I’m ready to take on the day, and feel a bit naked without it now. Vanity aside, I really love Michael Kors’ products… and overall am a jewelry fanatic.

My favorite place in the world is

Nice, France (and of course Kenya – there’s no place like home!). I like to travel a lot and do so for both work and pleasure. Most of my vacations are built off of work trips, doing international lectures or presentations. My most favorite spot, outside of Kenya, where I grew up, is a small coastal town in the south of France called Nice. It was unfortunately on the news within the last couple of years for a terrorist event. Regardless, Nice emulates a relaxation spot: cozy beaches, warm, sunny afternoons, outdoor markets, plazas with fountains and children playing in them, cobblestone streets, friendly people, wonderful wine and food. So far, it’s been my favorite spot to visit.

Top on my bucket list is to

travel (per usual)– top destinations at the moment are: Cuba, Morocco, South Africa and New Zealand/ Australia

Dr. Christine Ngaruiya is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine (DEM) at Yale University.


 

Her past honors include: the Emergency Medicine Resident’s Association (EMRA) Augustine D’Orta Award for outstanding community and grassroots involvement, Harambe Entrepreneur Alliance Associate and the 2014 Harambe Pfizer Fellow Award for social entrepreneurship, and the 2016 University of Nebraska Outstanding International Alumnus award.


 

Dr. Ngaruiya has also held several national leadership positions including with: the American Medical Students’ Association (AMSA), the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA), the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine’s (SAEM) Global Emergency Medicine Academy, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH)-Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC)-Canadian Society for International Health (CSIH) Trainee Conference and Advisory Committee.


 

Read Dr. Christine Ngaruiya’s full bio here and read about her journey to visionary scholarship and work here and here